Civil rights leader calls for more work to be done

Posted by ncarter | 01/19/2010 06:40 AM

Story by Preston Sparks, The Augusta Chronicle
Photo courtesy of Rainier Ehrhardt/The Augusta Chronicle

At an event honoring the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday, a man who knew him well, the Rev. James Lawson, told an Augusta crowd Friday that more work is needed in the struggle for equality.

"To remember the '60s in Augusta, you have come a long way. And you have a long way to go," the civil rights leader said during the gathering, which was held at Paine College and included officials from Paine, Augusta State University, Augusta Technical College and Medical College of Georgia.
The Rev. Lawson told the hundreds packed into Paine's Gilbert-Lambuth Memorial Chapel that the civil rights movement, part of which he spent working with Dr. King, spanned the 1950s through the 1970s and "was too short and was aborted before its time by the forces of violence and racism in the United States."
"We need a fresh burst in the United States of equality, liberty and justice for all, and we the people must make it happen," he said. "Obama and the Congresses and governors will not do it unless we ordinary people are mobilized for change."

Speaking of President Obama, the Rev. Lawson -- a retired Methodist pastor and now Distinguished University Professor at Vanderbilt University -- said "we have every reason this year to celebrate," but added, "the white majority of this country did not vote for Barack Obama."
The Rev. Lawson also mentioned an incident in the news in which Democratic Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid was quoted in a book referring in 2008 to then-Sen. Obama as "light-skinned" and "with no Negro dialect."

Mr. Reid apologized to the president, who said he forgave the senator.
"We will continue to have such incidents of that because racism is a fact of life in the United States no matter how much we may deny it," the Rev. Lawson said. "No matter how much we may want to run away from it, it is a reality."

The Rev. Lawson then spoke of his time with Dr. King, whose life and legacy will be honored Monday with a federal holiday. The retired pastor, whom Dr. King once dubbed "the leading nonviolence theorist in the world," recalled how he first met Dr. King in the '50s and how Dr. King asked for his help.
In 1968 the Rev. Lawson invited Dr. King to Memphis to help black sanitation workers who had gone on strike.
The day before his assassination, Dr. King delivered his famous "Mountaintop" speech in support of the strikers.

"On the last day of his life, we met early in the morning for about an hour or so of discussion," the Rev. Lawson said.

He said Dr. King's movement was about recognizing that "every human being is in the image of God and should be treated like that in all facets."
At Friday's event the crowd sang spirituals and ended with blacks and whites seated next to one another, holding hands and collecting money for those in Haiti affected by this week's deadly earthquake.
For Paine College freshman Michael Woodard, the event was a call to change for the better.

"It's up to the youth to take that step forward," he said.

Civil Rights Leader keynote speaker for Annual Martin Luther King Day Celebration

Posted by ncarter | 01/15/2010 05:58 AM


CIVIL RIGHTS LEADER KEYNOTE SPEAKER FOR ANNUAL 
MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY CELEBRATION

(AUGUSTA, GA)– On January 15, 2010 Paine College,Augusta Technical College, Augusta State University and Medical College of Georgia will present the annual Tri-College Martin Luther King Day Celebration. The event will began at 12 p.m. in the Gilbert-Lambuth Memorial Chapel. This years, keynote speaker is The Reverend James Lawson, professor, pastor and civil rights leader.

Lawson first met the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1957, and they soon joined forces to realize their dream of starting a non-violent mass movement and continued to work with King until his death but has never given up on their shared dream of racial harmony.

Lawson was dubbed by King as “the leading nonviolence theorist in the world,” studied the Gandhian movement in India before becoming a leader in the civil rights movement. His life – including his student years at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. has been marked by an abiding faith in Christianity and non-violence, and a willingness to pay the price for those beliefs.

He served 13 months of a three-year prison sentence for refusing the draft during the Korean War, and was expelled from Vanderbilt in 1960 because of his work helping to desegregate lunch counters in downtown Nashville. After a national press uproar and threats of mass faculty resignations, a compromise allowed Lawson to complete his graduate studies at Vanderbilt University. He opted instead to complete his degree at Boston University.

Lawson went on to a career in the ministry, serving for 25 years as pastor of Holman United Methodist Church in Los Angeles, before becoming pastor emeritus in 1999. He returned to Vanderbilt Divinity School in 1970-71 during a sabbatical, and that school recognized him in 1996 with its first Distinguished Alumnus Award. The Association of Vanderbilt Black Alumni named Lawson the 2002 Walter R. Murray Distinguished Alumnus, and he was named Vanderbilt’s 2005 Distinguished Alumnus.

He continues to spend much of his time at Vanderbilt teaching, speaking and participating in discussion groups with faculty. Lawson was interviewed for the original documentary on the civil rights movement, and is delighted that another generation can view “Eyes on the Prize”. 

“It gives a picture of the scope of the (civil rights) movement,” Lawson said. “Dr. (Martin Luther) King and the movement in the black South, especially in the ‘50s and ‘60s, represents the zenith of the struggle of the American people to become the kind of people that … this idealist wants us to become.”

Vanderbilt archiving experts are cataloguing his papers, and Lawson plans to do some writing – perhaps an autobiography – based on the papers.

For more information, please contact Natasha Carter at (706) 396-7591.

###
Paine College is a church-related, four-year private institution. The mission of Paine College is to provide a liberal arts education of the highest quality that emphasizes academic excellence, ethical and spiritual values, social responsibility, and personal development to prepare men and women for positions of leadership and service in the African American community, the nation, and the world. Paine College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award baccalaureate degrees and functions partly by the generous support of The United Methodist Church, the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, and the United Negro College Fund. For additional information visit www.paine.edu.

Remembering Reverend Dr. Eugene Clayton Calhoun, Jr. – Humanitarian, Social Justice Advocate and Higher Education Pioneer

Posted by ncarter | 01/12/2010 02:32 AM


“I’ll Go Where You Want Me To Go” 
 
Photo courtesy of the Paine College Collins- Calaway Library Archives
Story compiled by Helene Carter

“I knew him first as my president, then as my employer, but I grew to love him as my friend,” said Dr. Mallory K. Millender, historian who graduated in 1964 from Paine College, Augusta, Georgia and went on to serve as a professor at his alma mater.  Paine College Historian,  Dr. Millender recounts the life and contributions of his friend, the late Reverend Dr. Eugene Clayton Calhoun, a Methodist minister who led Paine through “perhaps the 14 most significant years in American history – 1956-1970”.  Dr. Millender is joined by Dr. Silas Norman, President of the Paine College National Alumni Association, and by Dr. George C. Bradley, President of Paine College, who gave an account of their personal experiences with Dr. Calhoun.

The Reverend Dr. Eugene Clayton Calhoun, Jr., age 97, died on Thursday, December 31, 2009 at Givens Estate in Asheville, North Carolina.  The Paine College community mourns the passing of this remarkable, gentle but fearless trailblazer who lived life filled with compassion for his fellowman. Dr. Calhoun, the eighth president of Paine College, led the effort to establish the Black College Fund through which the United Methodist Church provides funds to Historically Black Colleges and Universities.  His “calling to serve humanity” took him across the globe from the Far East to Georgia and on each journey carved an indelible path of social justice for the invisible man and those who were voiceless.
 
In Dr. Mallory Millender’s voice, “he was loved by students, faculty, staff and alumni. We loved him because he treated us the way we hoped that all people would treat us--but few Southern whites did--with respect, fairness and love.”             
           
Dr. Silas Norman, Jr., also a Paine graduate, served as a Student Government President during Dr. Calhoun’s administration.  “I had the opportunity to be a student during the tumultuous years of civil rights activity that began to sweep the nation, “said Norman. He further commented, “The Paine College student body was very active in challenging the historic racial segregation and discrimination existent in the Augusta community. Dr. Calhoun  exhibited a level of decency, sensitivity, and support that we respected. I cannot remember a single instance where he took any action to discourage or stifle our efforts. In fact, he took a public stance in support of our activities.”
 
Millender describes Dr. Calhoun as a “bridge builder” in the community.  “He was born to Christian parents who defied segregation.  His father, a minister and a lawyer, felt that he had a moral as well as a legal responsibility to fight discrimination. And he instilled those values in his children.”
 
            Said Millender, “I believe that Dr. Calhoun was perhaps divinely placed at Paine College during the tumultuous years when this nation moved from segregation to integration. The Methodist church sent him to do mission work in the Far East because few people in the church had the skills needed to work with the cultures in Japan and China.”
 
            “From China, Dr. Calhoun came to Paine because he had long ago adopted the philosophy of the song, "I'll Go Where You Want Me to Go, Dear Lord," He said.”And He just set me down in my native South in the midst of the Civil Rights Revolution."
           
“He hosted James Farmer and the Freedom Riders on the Paine campus just before their buses were turned over and burned in Anniston, Alabama in 1961. And he was president at Paine in 1970 when the Augusta riot resulted in the death of six black men, all of them shot in the back.”
 
            Remembering the Augusta riot, Millender said, “As a white man respected in the black and white communities, he was a stabilizing force when then-governor Lester Maddox sent 2,000 National Guard troops to Augusta to quell the riot, many of whom surrounded the Paine campus, "not to protect you, but to contain you," he said the head of the National Guard unit told him, adding, "We have you cordoned off." During the same month, a shot was fired into Dr. Calhoun's home, missing his head by less than a foot.”
 
            “Dr. Calhoun knew how to raise support for Paine College, said Millender. “When he came to Paine, the institution was in danger of closing for financial reasons. But Dr. Calhoun raised money, attracted outstanding faculty members, and raised expectations.”            
 
Recounting his first meeting with Dr. Calhoun, Dr. George C. Bradley, said, “A Christian man of great faith, Dr. Calhoun believed in that part of the Paine College mission to “provide a liberal arts education of the highest quality that emphasizes academic excellence, ethical and spiritual values, social responsibility, and personal development.”  Bradley goes on to say, “Dr. Calhoun is best known for building many of the physical structures on campus. Of particular note, the Gilbert-Lambuth Memorial Chapel, was erected during his tenure. The painting that hangs in the narthex of Gilbert-Lambuth pictures Dr. John Wesley Gilbert and Bishop Walter R. Lambuth, two individuals that Dr. Calhoun admired very much.  It is said that when these humble individuals met in London to start their missionary journey to the Congo, Gilbert asked, “What shall be our relationship?” Lambuth replied, “We shall be as brothers.”  When I met Dr. Calhoun for the first time in the fall of 2008 it was if I had met a brother in the Spirit.”
 
“Dr. Calhoun was also a visionary,” commenting Dr. Millender who recounts an incident involving a Paine College professor whose work led to the establishment of the Head Start Program. Dr. Millender recounts Dr. Calhoun’s persevering actions surrounding a Paine College professor.  In the voice of Dr. Calhoun…..[“And I think I told you that Mrs. Mattie Bell Braxton, professor of education, really carried a lot of compassion for me. She put her arms around me coming down the stairs there.  And she did it with the greatest of ease, with no sense of difference in our age or in our ethnicity. She put her arms around my shoulders and said, “How are you doing?” in one of those toughest times.  And I was so distressed when they called and told me about her service, that I couldn’t go there. Our relationship was special. I don’t know how to classify it. It’s just the way it is. But I was disappointed not to be at her funeral service. And Dr. Scott went—not instead, but they did ask him, and he went. And he related a special incident.  She had made an application to one of the agencies of the national government for a grant for a program that she had designed for Paine College.  And they had turned it down because they said that there was a program at Dillard that was too much like that. And I thought that was a very poor reason for turning her down. The truth of the matter, the program was very much what eventually became known as the Head Start program. Now we were involved in Head Start.  I called the Congressman [Stephens]. I think he was from Athens or somewhere over in there. I asked him to come by the College on his way back to Washington. And I had some of our trustees meet with him.  We met in the President’s Dining Room there in the new Campus Center. I told him that they had turned us down because they said it was too much like a program at Dillard. I told him that if the program at Dillard was that good for them to make the grant, that this just seemed to me to be not just awful, but a violation of integrity. And he agreed with it. He went right back, and we got a grant that got us started in what became the Head Start Program.  But that was Mrs. Braxton’s doing. So it was a deep personal exchange between us. It’s something that I’ll always remember.”]
 
“During my last visit with Dr. Calhoun on the Paine Campus in 2009, I had the opportunity to express our appreciation for his leadership and decency that he exhibited during some very challenging years of  challenge to racial segregation and discrimination that characterized our society”, said Norman. “Even before we began our demonstrations and community meetings with Augusta City officials, I remember an incident that characterized his consistency of character and support for students. In the Spring of 1959, the College Choir took a trip to Florida. Upon returning, we had occasion to stop in Louisville, Ga. because of mechanical problems with the bus. While there at the service station where the bus was being repaired,  those of us on the bus bought soda pop from the station. We had deposits on bottles in those days, which I remember as  three to four cents. However, the proprietor charged us more than 10 cents. We were at the station longer than expected , and sought to return the bottles and retrieve our deposits. The  proprietor objected to returning our deposits, and when we insisted, he called the police. They arrived  and demanded that we board our bus and leave town. When we did not move quickly enough, we were herded to the bus at gunpoint. The last person to board the bus was the late Joseph Stinson, then Chairman of the Student Body.  Joseph was physically assaulted because he was not moving fast enough. Dr Calhoun went to Louisville to meet with Louisville City officials to protest our treatment. Then as now, his action, while appropriate, was not typical of the response we  had come to expect from White people.”
 
Dr. Calhoun was the architect of the modern Paine College environment and much of the Paine campus. Eight buildings were erected during his tenure: Gray Hall, Belle Bennett Hall, Hollis Hall, Irvin Hall, the Edmund Peters Campus Center, the President's House (Paine House), the Dean of Students' residence, and the Gilbert-Lambuth Chapel which has stones embedded, in front of the altar, which he brought back from the ruins of Ephesus in Greece. 
           
Dr. Calhoun’s book, Men Who Ventured Much and Far, tells the story of John Wesley Gilbert, a minister in the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church, and Walter Russell Lambuth, a bishop in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, who in 1911 went to the Belgian Congo and set up the first Methodist mission in Africa.
 
Said Dr. Bradley, “Dr. Calhoun was the oldest living past president of Paine College.  He will be sorely missed by the Paine College community and by all who knew and loved him.  We thank God for the life, wisdom and vision of Dr. E. Clayton Calhoun and pray God’s mercy for his family.  Echoing Bradley’s sentiments, Norman said, “We will miss the likes of an E. Clayton Calhoun. May he rest in peace.”

10th Annual Scholarship Masked Ball tickets now available

Posted by ncarter | 12/17/2009 04:31 AM

(AUGUSTA, GA) – The Chi-Lites will headline Paine College’s 10th Annual Scholarship Masked Ball on Friday, February 12, 2010. The event will begin at 7 p.m. in the Augusta Marriott Hotel & Suites. The highly anticipated black tie scholarship benefit has become Paine College’s premiere fundraising event. In the past, it has attracted celebrities and dignitaries that included, former Supreme, Mary Wilson; Grammy Award winner, Lou Rawls; Soul Food star, Darrin Henson; singer and Tony Award winner, Melba Moore; actor and singer Clifton Davis, Emmy Award winner Cicely Tyson; and 1968 Gold-Medalist, Tommie Smith and many more.

Like years before, this year’s event will be one filled with memories that will last a lifetime. Guests will have the opportunity to bid on fine art at the Silent Art Auction. There will also be the famed “Parade of Masks” and the “Purple Carpet”. Guest will also enjoy an evening of fine dining, dancing, and entertainment. The College invites area businesses and corporations to participate by providing generous sponsorships for the event. Early reservations for prime seating and sponsorships are now being accepted. Tickets may be purchased for $100 from the Paine College Business Office, Haygood- Holsey Hall, Suite 109 or by calling (706) 821-8233.

 Proceeds benefit the Paine College student scholarships. About The Chi-Lites The Chi-Lites have shaped the sound of soul in the Midwest since the 1970’s. With 11 top ten R&B singles during a single decade, The Chi-Lites proved to be consistent with their popular style and sound. Some of their top-selling singles on the 70’s were “Have You Seen Her” and “Oh Girl”. In the early 1990’s, The Chi-Lites entered the studio with a dynamic blend of all new material. Songs, such as “Happy Music”, add an up-tempo flare to their music, while “Solid Love Affair” brings listeners back to a more traditional ballad. The magic of The Chi-Lites has proven to be undiminished and will always be a vital sound to Chicago soul.

For more information contact Natasha Carter at (706) 396-7591 or ncarter@paine.edu. Please visit www.paine.edu for updates about the event.

Civil rights leader keynote speaker for annual MLK Day Celebration

Posted by ncarter | 12/9/2009 12:52 PM


(AUGUSTA, GA)– On January 15, 2010 Paine College, Augusta Technical College, Augusta State University and Medical College of Georgia will present the annual Martin Luther King Day Celebration. The event will began at 12 p.m. in the Gilbert-Lambuth Memorial Chapel. This years, keynote speaker is The Reverend James Lawson, professor, pastor and civil rights leader.

Lawson first met the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1957, and they soon joined forces to realize their dream of starting a non-violent mass movement and continued to work with King until his death but has never given up on their shared dream of racial harmony.

Lawson was dubbed by King as “the leading nonviolence theorist in the world,” studied the Gandhian movement in India before becoming a leader in the civil rights movement. His life – including his student years at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. has been marked by an abiding faith in Christianity and non-violence, and a willingness to pay the price for those beliefs.

He served 13 months of a three-year prison sentence for refusing the draft during the Korean War, and was expelled from Vanderbilt in 1960 because of his work helping to desegregate lunch counters in downtown Nashville. After a national press uproar and threats of mass faculty resignations, a compromise allowed Lawson to complete his graduate studies at Vanderbilt University. He opted instead to complete his degree at Boston University.

Lawson went on to a career in the ministry, serving for 25 years as pastor of Holman United Methodist Church in Los Angeles, before becoming pastor emeritus in 1999. He returned to Vanderbilt Divinity School in 1970-71 during a sabbatical, and that school recognized him in 1996 with its first Distinguished Alumnus Award. The Association of Vanderbilt Black Alumni named Lawson the 2002 Walter R. Murray Distinguished Alumnus, and he was named Vanderbilt’s 2005 Distinguished Alumnus.

He continues to spend much of his time at Vanderbilt teaching, speaking and participating in discussion groups with faculty. Lawson was interviewed for the original documentary on the civil rights movement, and is delighted that another generation can view “Eyes on the Prize”. 

“It gives a picture of the scope of the (civil rights) movement,” Lawson said. “Dr. (Martin Luther) King and the movement in the black South, especially in the ‘50s and ‘60s, represents the zenith of the struggle of the American people to become the kind of people that … this idealist wants us to become.”

Vanderbilt archiving experts are cataloguing his papers, and Lawson plans to do some writing – perhaps an autobiography – based on the papers.

For more information, please contact Natasha Carter at (706) 396-7591.

###
Paine College is a church-related, four-year private institution. The mission of Paine College is to provide a liberal arts education of the highest quality that emphasizes academic excellence, ethical and spiritual values, social responsibility, and personal development to prepare men and women for positions of leadership and service in the African American community, the nation, and the world. Paine College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award baccalaureate degrees and functions partly by the generous support of The United Methodist Church, the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, and the United Negro College Fund. For additional information visit www.paine.edu.

Alumni Spotlight: Norman '62 slated to receive Trailblazer Award from Wayne State School of Medicine

Posted by ncarter | 12/8/2009 12:38 PM

The Wayne State University School of Medicine will honor Silas Norman Jr., M.D., assistant dean for Admissions, when the school’s alumni association launches the Ensure the Dream, Secure the Future scholarship campaign Dec. 10.

Dr. Norman, assistant dean for Admissions at the School of Medicine, will receive the Trailblazer Award, which honors outstanding alumni and faculty who have made substantial contributions and demonstrated courage, initiative, innovation, risk-taking and leadership.

An assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine, Dr. Norman has been involved in admissions for the School of Medicine for more than 25 years.

Dr. Norman received a bachelor’s degree in Natural Sciences from Paine College, Augusta, Ga. in 1962 and is a 1976 graduate of the Wayne State University School of Medicine. He completed his internship and residency in Internal Medicine at Detroit General Hospital. Dr. Norman is active in church and civic affairs and organizations. He is board chairman of the Community Health Awareness Group Inc.

He received the 2000 Alumni Achievement Awards of both the United Negro College Fund Inc. and the Organization of Black Alumni of Wayne State University.

Dr. Norman is a member of county, state and national medical societies. He is a diplomat of the American Board of Internal Medicine and is certified as an Advanced Correctional Health professional. He was recently appointed president of the Paine College National Alumni Association.

The purpose of the event, which begins at 6 p.m. Dec. 10 at the Detroit Athletic Club, is to focus on scholarship initiatives, recognize scholarship donors to this campaign, showcase student organizations and their missions, and present the annual Trailblazer and Ambassador awards.

Congratulations from the Paine College Community.

Dr. Bradley encourages you to know your status

Posted by ncarter | 12/1/2009 06:55 AM

Ethical and spiritual values, as well as social responsibility, compel me to call attention to an epidemic that is wreaking havoc in communities across this country and around the world. Although the HIV/AIDS epidemic affects everyone, it is having a particularly devastating impact on communities of color and for individuals living in poverty.


Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicate that nearly half (46 percent) of the new cases of HIV/AIDS are African-Americans. Of the new cases reported, more than 70 percent are caused by individuals who do not know their HIV status.

A recent report titled "Passing the Test: The Challenges and Opportunities of HIV Testing in Black America" identifies four factors that hinder progress in controlling the disease. Those factors include: the stigma of being harmed if test results are positive; testing as a part of medical exams is not routine; the continued requirement of written consent in many states; and the failure of effective marketing efforts to promote testing.

Starting today -- World AIDS Day -- and ending Sunday, Dec. 6, every person in Augusta will have multiple opportunities to become educated regarding this issue; to show support for individuals who have HIV or AIDS; and to be an advocate for addressing this public health concern. I encourage everyone to participate in activities that have been planned by a diverse group of organizations to promote HIV prevention in Augusta.

As academics, advocates and good neighbors, I hope that we will all do our parts personally and professionally to eradicate this horrific disease in our community. A call to action includes educating oneself, protecting yourself and praying for all who have been touched by HIV/AIDS.

I join with all leaders who understand how important it is to raise awareness about this disease and to support prevention efforts.

Knowing your HIV status is a right and responsibility. Knowing your partner's HIV status can save your life. I have been tested. Have you?

Dr. George C. Bradley

Augusta

(This was featured in the Augusta Chronicle)

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2009/12/01/let_557619.shtml

Paine College celebrates World AIDS Day with annual candlelight walk

Posted by ncarter | 11/30/2009 15:25 PM

(AUGUSTA, GA)– Paine College will host a World AIDS Day program and candlelight walk on Tuesday, December 1 2009, at 6 p.m. in the Gilbert-Lambuth Memorial Chapel. The program will be hosted by Selina Soul of 96.3 KISS FM. The program will also feature performances by Angelic Dance Team from Jenkins White Charter Elementary School.  Following the program, a candlelight vigil and walk will take place on the Paine College campus.

The Paine College and CSRA Community will engage in events throughout the week to bring awareness about the AIDS epidemic. Miss and Mr. Paine College will present “The Power of No” play at 8 p.m. and an encore presentation will be given on December 2, 2009 at 6:30 p.m. in the Tabernacle Baptist Church Family Life Center.  Events for the week will be held at various locations. Please see schedule of events for more details.

Schedule of Events

December 1
WORLDAIDS DAY CEREMONY
Richmond County Health Dept.
St.Paul Episcopal Church
605 Reynolds Street
12:00 pm

CANDLELIGHT WALK
Augusta World AIDS Day Committee
Paine College
1235 15thStreet
6:00 pm

“THE POWER OF NO” PLAY
Augusta World AIDS Day Committee
Miss and Mr. Paine College
Paine College
1235 15thSt.
8:00 pm

FREE RAPID HIV TESTING
MCG Ryan White Outreach Team
Aiken Center
1105 Gregg Hwy Aiken, SC
Call 803/649-1900 ext. 0 for appt.
2:00-7:00 pm

December 2
LIGHT UP THE NIGHT
Eisenhower Army Medical Center (Fort Gordon)
Fort Gordon
300 Hospital Road
6:00-9:00

GIRLS NIGHT OUT
“Light the Night in Red”
Augusta World AIDS Day Committee
Macedonia Baptist Church
1828 Wrightsboro Rd.
6:30 pm

Encore Presentation of
“THE POWER OF NO” PLAY
Augusta World AIDS Day Committee
Miss and Mr. Paine College
Tabernacle Baptist Church
Family Life Center
1223 Laney Walker Blvd
6:30 pm

December 4
1stFRIDAY HIV INFORMATION SHARING
Augusta World AIDS Day Committee
Augusta Commons
836 Reynolds St.
4:00 pm

FREE RAPID HIV TESTING
MCG Ryan White Outreach Team
Pyramid Music
824 Broad Street
4:00-8:00 pm

RED RIBBON BALL
St. Stephens Ministries
Marion Hatcher Center
519 Greene Street
7:00 pm

December 5
FREE RAPID HIV TESTING
MCG Ryan White Outreach Team
Pyramid Music
1647 Gordon Hwy
1:00-2:30 pm

BALLIN’FOR A CAUSE
HIV/AIDS Awareness Basketball Game
Augusta World AIDS Day Committee
Lucy C. Laney Gymnasium
1339 Laney Walker Blvd
3:00 pm

December 6
WORLD AIDS DAY WORSHIP SERVICE
Richmond County Health Dept.
St. Marks United Methodist Church
1296 Marks Church Rd.
11:00 am
For more information
706-993-5206 or arfreeman@mcg.edu

For more information contact Natasha Carter, Director of Public Relations at (706) 396-7591.

Paine student seldom goes unnoticed

Posted by ncarter | 11/19/2009 07:29 AM

Story by Nakisha Dicks, '07 and courtesy of the Augusta Chronicle

Courtney Gray began the school year at Paine College under the radar.

His low profile didn't last long, however, because those who recognized him quickly spread the word that an actor was in their midst, he said.

"I'm known as the boy on Meet the Browns," the 19-year-old said with a laugh. "They'll ask me, 'You're the boy on Meet the Browns?' and I just nod and say 'Yeah, that's me.' Then they'll go tell others, 'Hey, that's the boy on Meet the Browns!' "

Mr. Gray has appeared in two episodes of the TBS sitcom this season. The freshman mass communications major from Atlanta plays Jamal, a character who loves his best friend, Brianna, but tends to keep his emotions to himself. A little more than a month ago, he taped a third episode that will air later in the season.

It has always been his goal to be in a Tyler Perry production, he said of the playwright, screenwriter, producer, director, actor and author.

"I like that he always has a message in his works," he said. "In every single TV episode, every single play, every single movie, he has a message for the people -- something to make you think, something to make you a better person."

He found that he had the role while he was bowling with friends in Stockbridge, Ga.

"The first thing I did when they called me was drop down to my knees and thank God, because I'd been waiting for something like this to happen for forever," he said. "The first thing that popped in my head was, 'Thank you, Jesus, for blessing me with this part.' "

There were struggles before he got his dream job, but his faith kept him determined, he said.

"A couple of times I almost gave up on acting because I had auditions here and there, but nothing was happening," he said. "I was like 'OK, I've auditioned here, auditioned here and auditioned here, but when am I going to get a part?'

''But every time I've almost given up on it, God has redirected me and smacked something right in my face. Whenever I wanted to walk away, I would walk right back into acting. It's definitely been a journey."

He goes to tapings only when he's called, so he hasn't had to make any major adjustments as a student.

"When I'm called, I'll just go home for a few days, do what I have to do and come back," he said.

What's next?

"It's whatever God wants me to do. I can say I want to do this or that, but it's whatever God has planned for me," he said. "All I can do is stay prepared and continue to work on the gift God has given me."

Reach Nikasha Dicks at (706) 823-3336 or nikasha.dicks@augustachronicle.com.

Former SC State coach and hall of famer Willie Jeffries keynote speaker for Paine's 2nd Annual Athletic Director's Luncheon

Posted by ncarter | 11/18/2009 10:33 AM

(AUGUSTA, GA)- On Friday, November 20, 2009 at 12 Noon, former head football coach of South Carolina State University and hall of famer Willie Jefferies will serve as the keynote speaker for the 2nd Annual Paine College Athletic Director’s Luncheon. The luncheon will take place in the  Warren A. Candler Memorial Library Building on the campus of Paine College.

Willie Jeffries, a native of Union, South Carolina, earned his Bachelor’s degree in civil engineering and a Master’s degree in guidance and counseling from South Carolina State University. Additionally, he studied at Indiana University. 
 
Jeffries’ coaching career began in 1960 as assistant coach at Barr Street High School in Lancaster, SC. A head coaching position followed in 1961 at Granard High School in Gaffney, SC where he compiled a six-year 65-7-2 mark, and won three (1964-1966) consecutive state AAA championships.

He began his first tenure at SCSU in 1973, completing an impressive 50-13-4 record in six seasons. Following a hiatus from SCSU, 1978-1989, Jeffries returned to begin his second tenure which spanned 13 years. Jeffries also earned a national title and made three Heritage Bowl appearances after returning to Orangeburg in 1989. During his remarkable 29-year collegiate head-coaching career, which included five-year stints each at Wichita State, where he became the first African-American head football coach of a Division I-A program and Howard University, Jeffries compiled a 179-132-6 record. This record included six Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) championships, two national titles, several post-season appearances, and numerous coaching awards. Jeffries also produced a number of players who have distinguished themselves in professional football and other professions as well.

Jeffries left SCSU in 2001, with a winning season. He later became the director of athletic fund-raising at SCSU where he stayed until January 2005 when he accepted the athletic director position at Grambling State University.

During and after his outstanding career he received several honors.  He was inducted into the SCSU Athletic Hall of Fame in 1998. He is also a member of the South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame, and the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) Hall of Fame. He has also received numerous honors for his community service including the Order of the Silver Crescent, South Carolina’s highest award for outstanding community service, the Order of the Palmetto, South Carolina’s highest civilian award. A scholarship fund and endowment have been established in his name at SCSU. During the 2002 school year, he was honored by the Black Coaches’ Association (BCA) with a lifetime achievement award and inducted into the South Carolina Black Hall of Fame. 

He is a member of several coaching, professional and civic organizations, including the American Football Coaches Association, Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., and NCAA Football Rules Committee.

Jeffries remains a committed ambassador for SCSU, the Orangeburg community, South Carolina and the nation. 

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